New Anti-HCV Therapies May Reduce Liver Transplant Demand

For more than 20 years, Dr. Lewis Teperman has worked in numerous capacities, including that of the NYU Langone Medical Center’s director of transplantation. A liver transplant expert, Dr. Lewis Teperman has also conducted research on the care of patients with liver tumors or liver disease.

According to the American Journal of Managed Care, new agents for the fight against HCV are yielding better results with shorter treatment periods. The introduction of medications like Sofosbuvir (Sovaldi) and Simeprevir (Olysio) signifies a momentous step towards managing a disease that creates an overwhelming demand for liver transplants and claims the lives of an estimated 16,000 Americans per year. Used with Ribavirin and Interferon, these medications have been shown to reduce the effects of HCV and to do so three to six months faster than previous treatments. HCV patients currently receive a third of all available liver transplants in the United States, and these breakthrough treatments can help decrease that demand.

While physicians prescribed Sofosbuvir almost 5,000 times within the first two months of its release, many early-stage patients are choosing to wait for the arrival of next-generation medications on the market. The next wave of medications will offer reduced side effects and even higher success rates in the battle against the slowly progressing viral disease.

Dr. Teperman leads a research study at NYULMC transplant which is looking at how to treat patients with alternatives to Interferon.

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